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20121104
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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
-- the national academy of sciences, the journal, proceedings of the national academy of sciences took a survey of scientists who work on this a couple of years ago, and there was agreement among 97% of scientists that fossil fuel emissions from human activity lead to global warming. are warming the atmosphere. that's an incredibly high consensus. so it's 97% in agreement. 3% in disagreement. at this consensus. at this point the scientific consensus is very, very strong that burning coal and oil and fossil fuels is warming the planet and leading to these extreme weather situations. >> so, this question really, then, is directed to the 3% of scientists as we look at the latest cover of "business week" it speaks for itself, coral, we had new york city mayor michael bloomberg endorsing the president in a piece largely focused on climate change. is this a wake-up call and could it end the debate? >> the problem is you can't ever say any one specific weather event is caused by climate change but you can look at the growing stack of reports saying we know we're going to see more of this. the national
are at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to come down here and enjoy the great science festival and you want to do that, hey, we have some great weather outside today. it looks like things will stay dry. the temperatures running a little bit cool, 40s and 50s now, but by the afternoon, high pressure taking over. and the temperatures warming up. we're planning on 60s and 70s. much improved weather throughout the weekend. high pressure bringing some 80s by sunday and monday. then cooling off toward the middle of next week. >>> as superstorm sandy bears down on new jersey, delta airlines starts moving planes and people all over the country. >> it's orderly. we know exactly where they're going and it's clean. >> we'll go inside the operations control center this morning to show you how delta shut down service, then restarted it after the storm. >>> and two top intelligence officials from afghanistan came to washington for a training course. then they disappeared. so where did they go and are they a threat? former intelligence insider john miller has some answers only on "cb
by the audience, of faculty members, and political science department, as well as the byu law school. some questions were edited for clarity. mr. hall will have the first question of the debate. for subsequent questions, we will alternates. each candidate will have a minute to as a question and both will have an additional 30 seconds for a bottle. if i determine that a follow-up question is aboard -- is appropriate, each will have a follow-up question. the first is from joseph, a student at purdum non-. -- at byu. >> what responsibilities are the state and local government and what responsibilities, if any, are the federal government? >> i served on the board of directors for sutter health care, so the largest not-for- profit health-careization in california we have known for a long time that we've had to have affordable quality health care. it is all our responsibility. under the affordable care act, we are first beginning to do what we need to do to reform health care system to make it affordable for all of us. i would like to put my children back on to health care until they're 26. i al
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. so i test... a lot. do you test with this? freestyle lite test strips? i don't see... beep! wow! that didn't take much blood. yeah, and the unique zipwik tab targets the blood and pulls it in. so easy. yep. freestyle lite needs just a third the blood of onetouch ultra. really? so testing is one less thing i have to worry about today. great. call or click today and get strips and a meter free. test easy. >>> paul ryan is running for vice president of the united states. why is the man running for president of the united states sending his running mate to places in the united states where the people who are going to decide the election cannot see him? that's ahead. zeebox is the free app that makes tv even better. if your tv were a prom queen, zeebox would be a stretch limo. with this enchanting union, comes a sunroof she can scream from... i'm goin' to prom! [ male announcer ] ...and a driver named bruce that she can re-name james... faster, james
to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child to. -- own a home, not rent. have a decent school to send your child to. helps send them to college. help your parents when they get older. that is why we are creating new manufacturing jobs, ted double exports. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. trained to million people over the next three years at community colleges. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump a
is committed to hiring 100 and thousand new science and technology teachers in our schools. committed to cutting the rate of inflation cut in half and committed to the student loan program. [applause] the old student loan system works like this. the federal government pays the bank a fee to make loans and the guaranteed 90% worth of loans. the new system works like this. under that old system, we dropped to 16 in the world with our young people with college degrees. it is a recipe for disaster. we cannot afford to be 16th in the world. what do the president and congress do? they passed laws to change the system. the government sets aside a loan reserve saying these are the ones eagle for loans. starting next year, everyone in the country gets one of these loans will have the absolute right to pay back as a low fixed percent of their income. think about this. [applause] what that means is nobody ever has to worry whether they cannot pay their loans. if he get out of college and you want to go teach in a small town in ohio or the salaries are low, you can do it anyway for a few years be
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> just before halloween last year was a giant snowstorm in the northeast. kind of ruined trick or treating and it turned out to be the only real snow we got all year. basically it sucked. this year we're anticipating another big weather event right before halloween and it's actually looking like it might be a big enough weather event it might mess with another big national thing a week after halloween and that's something you might have heard of called election day. halloween is wednesday and election day is the tuesday after that. forecasters at the national weather service have taken to calling what is upon us a frankenstorm. it's a come by niegs combination of a few things. it's a hurricane. but hurricane sandy combines with a winter storm coming out of the west and that combines further with a blast of arctic air. a storm or a storm system or combination of storm systems that's potentially this significant is always of national significance. but the fr
. that is why we commit to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child wito. rent. a home, not have a decent school to send your child to. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump and 12 million gallons -- barrels of oil over that time. the will level the playing field for the middle-class. because whenever the middle class is given a chance, they have never ever let their country d
to cut college tuition in half over the next decade. we committed to hire hundreds of science and math teachers over the next years. when we talk about the job, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on, own a home, not rent, have a decent school to send your child to come and be able to help send them to college, take care of your parents when they get older and save enough money that your children will not have to take care of you. that is why we are going to create new manufacturing jobs, change the tax code, reward companies that come home not those that go abroad. two million people, two million americans with the skills they need over the next three years at community colleges, working with businesses to ensure that when people finish school they can go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we're going to produce more american made energy, oil, clean coal, natural gas. alone, those will create 600,000 new jobs in 10 years. wind, solar, biofuel. we have already required automobiles to double their mileage. that alone will save 1.7 trillion dollars at the pump a
bionic leg this week in a demonstration of strength and science. >> jack built a house? >> reporter: when zac vawter heads out for a walk with his family, his amputated leg is no big deal. >> i'm not sure they remember dad with a normal leg, so it's just the way it is. >> reporter: but what he wants to do now, with a different leg, is a very big deal. it could help in changing the lives of thousands of amputees who have lost a leg. it involves this experimental leg, that like the real thing, obeys signals from his brain. but his story starts with a 2009 motorcycle accident that cost him his leg from the knee down. vawter knew about experimental surgeries so he persuaded neurosurgeons to save nerves from the amputated leg and attach them above the knee. he reached out to dr. levi hargrove at the center for bionic medicine. he wanted a chance at this leg. >> we have electrodes or sensors, antennas o his muscles. he thinks about bending his knee or benning his ankle. we decode those signals and send a command to the center. >> reporter: the $8 million is funned by the military, anxious to fi
what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. -- of the particular course the storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurricane
for it. we should recruits 100,000 map and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. change comes when we live up to america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our atmosphere, that will ma
can go a long way. >> math and science and english. >> exactly. >> i did not go to university, but i would like to help them. i feel excited. >> i'm going to be an accountant. >> i'm going to be a lawyer. >> i'm going to be a nurse. >> the work you are doing here is bringing change. >>> good evening, everyone. 10:00 on the east coast. late new word on exactly where hurricane sandy is heading and just how powerful it might be if and when it hits the east coast. now, the storm has already claimed nearly two dozen lives in the caribbean as it heads north. could morph into something else entirely, part tropical weather system, part winter nor'easter, possibly lingering for days over the eastern seaboard. in other words, a super storm. that's what new york governor andrew cuomo is very worried about. he declared a statewide emergency this afternoon. emergency orders also in effect in pennsylvania, virginia, maryland and the district of columbia. a baltimore power company declaring 2,000 out of state linesmen, some from as far away as new mexico. philadelphia's mayor telling people in floo
, virginia, yesterday. joining us is melissa harris perry. professor of political science at tulane university. she's a columnist for the nation and host of the melissa harris perry show here on msnbc. thank you for being here. >> absolutely. >> is there a hermetically sealed bubble around presidential elections or does what happens in these swing states reflect not just the presidential election but what has happened politically in those states since '08? >> i think the story you told about virginia going blue, and a story we didn't tell quite enough on election night in 2008. in part, because like ten minutes later we called the west coast and it was over. >> then the election was over. >> so no one really paused it to take note of it. but that transition is indicative of sort of how much virginia has changed as a place. it's always been a border state. it's always quite different in northern virginia than somewhere else. but the fact is that the fights that we have seen there over the course of the past four years is a shifting back and forth of the republican control and then th
sector and it has helped natural gas investment here with the marcellis shale. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. host: do you want to respond? guest: they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. and homeland security. the right thing to d
, schools give a break to students who major in math and science and those are most needed for florida's job market and undergrads studying political science, they have fewer job prospects in the state. >> alisyn: lady liberty. >> cool. >> alisyn: the statue's 126 anniversary and the celebration opening up to the public after a year long renovation and 30 million dollar project including remodeling the staircase to make it easier for visitors to climb and to climb, that was tough. and 26,000 more people visit each other. >> you climbed up and only made it up to the commissar i. >> alisyn: i was exhausted. >> clayton: can i get a coffee? and they put an elevator in there for handicapped individual who never before had a chance to go up and see a portion of the statue of liberty. today it could be open until it's closed later today by the federal government because of-- and meanwhile we have been talking over the last month what happened on september 11th of this year in libya. of course, our ambassador, a member of the embassy staff and two former navy seals were killed. jennifer griffin had
a bunch of stuff out today, the political science research which i'm very skeptical of. i would say for an incumbent president you have to do something. there's a lot of risk. there's a lot of potential for making a mistake. on a more simplistic level, i don't think if you're an incumbent you want people cranky when they go to the polls. it's not deep analysis, but it could be important. counterbalancing that, when people want the government to actually do something and do it well, they are much more likely to trust democrats in that circumstance. >> sure. >> the overall impact of the storm on the election is un unknowable. obama looks leader-like and presidential in the situation. he's part of the narrative of the storm, but then you pointed out, we're damaging early voting which is critical to the president's strategy. it becomes this situation like the president gets to look like a calm, strong leader in a crisis. that's the way some people read it. other people say the storm is obama's faumt and it proves he's weak. whatever way i see it, you see it that way. >> one problem for
.i.h., the national science foundation, so i would take issue with the fact that, you know, the republic of texas is making it all on their own. they're getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i don't have any problem with that at all. but to benefit from the oil industry in such a profound way is a unique situation. we don't have that situation every y -- everywhere. but texas does benefit from nasa, from the national science foundation and the national institutes of health. that's helped spur their economy as well. >> congressman, gary on twitter wants me to ask you, why didn't obama stick his neck out for the nonunion workers who lost their peppings in the auto bailout. can you talk that out? >> that's an urban legend. we are working, nart brown and i are working very hard to help the seven or eight splinter unions that didn't end up doing as well as the u.a.w., the iue crferings wa which had contracts essential to the development of the new general motors. but this is not a union-nonunion issue. there were seven or eight different unions that
reason. i don't know whether that's because how computer science is conducted in universities or i'm not with larry summers that i think it's all social and not physical. and on the other financial literacy. well, we didn't address that here because we're only looking at earnings and not at income from financial assets. we purposely made that decision to focus on earnings. as it is, that's an issue for the top 20% of the country. 93% of the value of all financial assets, includes pensions and retirement accounts and savings accounts and stocks and bonds all financial assets which is to say that every asset in the economy except homes. that's -- and art and gold or whatever. are held by the top 20% of the country. but financial literacy in the top 20%, i think does have an effect on ultimate in come. would it be a good idea to have greater financial literacy across income distribution? absolutely, and it would be better to figure out a way and there are lots of ways to do it for average people to accumulate assets other than their own homes. >> baby bonds, but that is another subjec
and development money that comes from nih, the national science foundation. i would take issue with the fact that the republic of texas is making it all on their own they are getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i have no problem with that at all. ilt to benefit from the oriole history and such a profound way, we do not have that everywhere. but they do benefit from nasa and the national institute of health. and that is helped to spur their economy as well. host: a question on twitter -- why did obama not stick his neck out for the non-union workers who lost their pensions and the auto bailout. guest: that is an urban legend. we are working very hard to help the delphi unions and other unions that did not end up doing as well as the uaw, iucwa to the development of the new general motors. but, this is not a union, non- union issue. there were seven or eight different unions that did not make out as well as other unions had. so there are many salaried people, delphi salaried folks that say this is the president picking the unions over the
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
and there is some political science research showing that just having that field office,, on the ground in a certain community does increase your share of the vote. but then there's a qualitative difference as well. the obama campaign, it's almost like a starbucks or a mcdonald's, a franchise operation, where every office is very much the same, it's all controlled by headquarters, they're all working off the same game plan, right down to every single office has what looks like this sort of nice grassroots touch, a poster on the wall that says, i support the president because, and then everybody has handwritten in their reasons they love obama underneath. every single office has that same poster, so it's very standardized, very controlled, very disciplined and they're all working off the same plan. romney actually does not have his own ground game at all. it's the r.n.c., the republican national committee that is operating the ground game for him and that's not necessarily a disadvantage, but it means he doesn't have that standardization, he is much more at the mercy at the strength of the r.n.c. and
that comes from nih -- the national science foundation. i would take issue that the republic of texas is making it on their own. they are getting substantial benefits from federal research and development sollars, which is fine. -- development dollars, which is fine. the benefit from the oil industry is a unique situation. we do not have that everywhere. texas' benefit from nasa, the national science foundation investment, and the national institutes of health. >> congressman gary wants me to ask you why obama did not stick his neck out for the non-union workers who lost their pensions in the auto bailout. >> that is an urban legend. we are working to help the unions that did not end up doing as well as the uaw and others. but this is not a union, non- union issue. there were seven or eight different unions that did not make out as other unions. there are many salaried folks who are saying this was the president picking the unions over the salary people. that is not true. there are other unions that did not make out -- it was a bankruptcy. it was a difficult decision. it is not true.
there's april quantitative difference, and there is some political science research showing that just having that field office, being on the ground in a certain community, does increase your share of the vote. but then there's a qualitative difference as well. the obama campaign, it's almost like a starbucks or a mcdonald's, a franchise operation, where every office is very much the same. it's all controlled by headquarters. they're all working off the same game plan, right down to every single office has what looks like this sort of nice grass-roots touch, a poster on the wall that says i support the president because -- and then everybody's handwritten in their reasons that they love obama underneath. every single office has that same poster. so it's very standardized, very controlled, very disciplined, and they're all working off the same plan. romney actually does not have his own ground game at all. it's the r.n.c., the republican national committee, that is operating the ground game for him. and that's not necessarily a disadvantage, but it means he doesn't have the standardizat
. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was designed to suppress certain votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. the right thing to do is to show photo id. the democrats are worried about pennsylvania. in 2010, we won the u.s. senate seat a
. and this is why i love the pollsters. they try to apply science and data that predict. we're talk about human beings. and human behavior is unpredictable. we can have a sense of what we think is going to happen. the numbers i've been looking at are some of the early vote numbers. for example if you look at some of of these battle ground states and the number of people who have already voted early, the percentages that mitt romney will have to get of the remaining vote, the math is pretty tough. >> in some of those battle ground states they're saying that election day seems to have the headwind behind mitt romney. >> it could. the point is we don't know. and as tony knows, early voters to some degree that's a different universe. we've talked about this before. that's a different universe of voters than necessarily the people that vote on election day so we don't know. >> go ahead, tony. >> you never know. the great benefit for early voters for any campaign if you've ever worked in a campaign, the great benefit of early voters you can forget about them. you don't have to concentrate your fire p
is what happened with that coverup in benghazi. you know, they said early there were no warning science. we have, at this network chronicled between half a dozen and a dozen of them. here another one, looks like a smoking gun a secret cable that said they had this emergency meeting three weeks before those guys were murdered. you know what? the consulate not safe. we should probably go ahead and hide out over at the cia outp away. nobody did anything. >> no, they didn't. there ought to be a pulitzer prize for catherine herridge and jennifer griffin at staff at fox news they have done yo men's work to get the truth out. >> first to say the government lied to us and now they are covering it up. it's becoming more clear every day. clear danger in benghazi. indication that the reason that the ambassador went there really secretly and quietly because he knew it was a treacherous place to be. why we haven't admitted that the only thing you can imagine is that we just don't want to admit that, you know, bin laden may be dead. but al qaeda is very much alive. it's the ambassador who is dead. do
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)